Tag Archives: #MaryBlakeHuer

Grateful For Wisdom When Ending The Journey Of Life: An Overview

I have always loved elderly people because they are wise and have wonderful stories to tell, if you listen. Unfortunately, we often get too busy during our own life’s journey to notice that older persons among us need more care from us. It is as though our journeys through life demand extra care when we begin our life, and again when we are nearing the end-of-life.

This posting includes my observations for you as a daughter, mom, friend, and health care professional regarding End-of-Life Care.

It is well known that people tend to like to stay at home as their journey through life comes to an end, but that is not always possible because of health issues, personal care needs, nutritional requirements, family distances, and so on. So, as we all age, the questions before us are: “What do we do?” “How do we plan for ourselves as we grower older and need extra care?”

Why am I posting this information for us today? Because I have watched my younger sister, my mom, and my dad pass away. Now I am watching dear friends and neighbors age, and I myself am growing older. As I was recently listening to Amanda Stead’s lecture on End-of-Life Care, I felt so grateful that Amanda reminded me, and helped me to summarize the wisdom we all have access to for our own planning:

  1. We are all going to die at the end of our life journey, so how does one prepare for the best end of life? There are multiple resources to inform us about end-of-life care just as there is knowledge regarding beginning life, as in birth, parenting, etc.
  2. As each of us, or our family members and friends age, it is important to learn about choices we each have regarding Hospice care, or Palliative care. Our choices do not need to be permanent as our health and care needs will change over time, but it is better to plan ahead and learn about such choices before being faced with an emergency.
  3. As one ages there needs to be decisions regarding independence, dignity, spiritual preferences, psychological, emotional needs, ethical decisions, and personal wishes.
  4. We all need to have people (family members or friends), who are our spokespeople in case we are unable to communicate clearly. We, or others, need to have an advanced directive (a written document) regarding our wishes for end-of life care.
  5. We all need to discuss realistic outcomes as we anticipate what may be coming in our future. Thus, before you become ill or lose the ability to communicate, you need to talk about what you imagine to be a good plan for your End-of-Life. You might begin such conversations by answering the question: “What matters to me most at the end of life is ______________________________________?”
  6. Sharing information is so important during this time. Information regarding your location preferences for where you wish to be as you grow older is important. Your financial costs, insurance coverage, wish for pain control, treatment preferences for eating, feeding, and swallowing should be identified.
  7. Your personal wishes, and cultural values are important and necessary to understand and honor during this time period.
  8. Reach out to Chaplains, Priests, Pastors, and Rabbis to incorporate your spiritual needs during these times of decision making.
  9. Take care of the above types of decisions before you grow too old for such planning. Make sure you share your thoughts with your family and friends.
  10. Know there is a “Dying Patient’s Bill of Rights”, and an abundance of resources provided through Medicare to assist you. Don’t put off till tomorrow what you should do today!

In the future, I plan to introduce a new “gratitude category” regarding end-of-life care as I am so grateful that information is available to me to provide for my dignity, spiritual, medical, psychological, and emotional needs as I grow older. In the context of generational differences in perception, as well as societal changes in our family constellations, it is more important than ever before to allow the elderly to prioritize their needs for independence as well as dependence on others.

I am grateful for knowledge regarding end-of-life care. How ’bout you?

For a spiritual perspective on End-Of-Life, let me conclude this blog with a poem written and read by my mother from her Book of Poetry titled, A House Inside of Me. The relevant poem for today is, I Don’t Want to Die I Like It Here. When you click on this link you will hear this poem. It seems relevant, in a more personal style of writing, to our topic today.

At this time in your life, What Matters Most to you for Planning? Please think about it as I am watching friends dealing and struggling with these issues right now.

#gratitudelite

A Splash of Gratitude Each Day Helps Keep the Doctor Away: Meaningful Use of Time

I am nearing 5 and 1/2 years of good health after a serious scare with illness and death. I ask myself this morning, “Did I make the most and best out of the extra 5 plus years I have been graced?” What did I do with these gifted years I asked God to give me?

Each day I strive to help others. Did I make a difference in any person’s life? Could I do more? These are very important questions I am asking myself.

During these five plus years my little dog has lost his hearing. I want to hold him tight and love him more. During these recent years, I have grown closer to my son and my brother and they to me as I cherish each moment I have with them. I have made new friends, have lost some friends, and have observed the truer meanings of family and friends in life.

My weight is about the same. My teeth are not whiter although they are stronger with a few new crowns and root canals. I have more beautiful flower gardens surrounding me, and I have this gratitude blog I began. My gratitudesquared.com site provides me a summary of my actions over these recent years. So, how have I used my time? Have I used this “gift of time” wisely?

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Love The Day You’re In!

I am watching the Nor’easter storm along the East Coast of North America today with projections of heavy snow and dangerous winds that will probably knock out power and cause flooding. Yet, I look out the window to see a soft blanket of beautiful fresh white snow covering my yard furniture. I have mixed feelings this day. Should I feel angry at the disruption that the snow may cause? Should I appreciate the quiet gentle cover before the storm ruins my day?

As I look at the window in the calm of day my memories flash back to the fun times I have had on my patio on those chairs at my table. Being a positive person, choosing to live in a State of Gratitude, as possible, I feel happy to see the untouched snow. I also feel fortunate to have so many good memories on that furniture under this snowfall.

I feel so grateful for each season, the good and the bad days within each season, and, most importantly, the memories I recall and share during each session with the people I love. Have gratitude today, and love the day you’re in!

#gratitudelite

Looking Towards The Future With Gratitude For The Past

Tomorrow is the last day of 2021 and oh what a year we have had. During the past eleven months, since beginning this blog, I have focused with gratitude on positivity for all of our many blessings in life. I have met many new friends and have tried to offer assistance to my family and friends in need.

Against the light I perceive from “joy”, “peace”, and “calm”, I admit I have noted the apparent stressors on people around me because of the ongoing variants of the virus, whether to wear masks or not, if and when we should take the vaccines, the economy going up or down daily, strategies within political parties, all the necessary zoom calls, changes to the educational system, changing weather systems, persons who are ill and dealing with death and dying, and more. Some days such news breaks my heart, but I purposefully try to steer my focus away from these negative forces in life. I go towards the “light” of life, and focus on the positive I feel, and I encourage you to do the same, if possible. Why?

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Gratitude For Simplicity

Gratitude is beautiful. Gratitude is simple. Gratitude is free. Gratitude feels good. Gratitude may be shared or solo. Gratitude brings joy. Gratitude is happiness. Gratitude may be given.

But, lately when watching the recent tornados, when watching our politicians, when reading social media, and/or when watching the news it feels like I am at threat of losing Gratitude, so I seek directions or wisdom to help me hang on.

I am reminded within a fortune cookie that “everything has beauty but not everyone sees it.” My mind reflects upon an extension to “Gratitude may be found in everything, but not everyone finds it.” So, as I sit in the stillness of my room, I look up the definition of “simplicity” which means something that is easy to understand or do, or something that is natural.

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Walking The Pathway to Gratitude

I have been posting for eleven (11) months now, 160 posts to date, as I walk and discover my own pathway to gratitude so I want to pause and reflect upon the meanings beneath my messages to you. First, living in a State of Gratitude is not always easy and takes being in a State of Mindfulness I would say.

I prefer to be mindful when I blog about gratitude. Intellectually, it feels the best!

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Through Gratitude We Are Generous (STICKS Poem)

This is the season of generosity. My mother (Marian E. Blake) composed a poem, “STICKS – Four Men Sitting Around A Fire”, that captures this spirit and reminds us what will happen when we act with greed. Just like the season of Thanksgiving, the various religious practices during the month of December should be practiced year round, yet we seem to get busy with life and we forget about the importance of giving to others.

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Gratitude For My Mother’s Teachings

Early today as I was considering topics for my posting, I found one of my mother’s poems that family always loved. A House Inside of Me, by Marian E. Blake. As we continue in this holiday weekend, I miss my mother who passed from this earth in 2007. To honor her life and all that she did for me, I play her poem for you. I am so grateful to my mother for the moral virtues she gave to me.

Actually, I previously included this poem in an earlier posting, but thought it was beautiful enough to include again today. In addition, I am also thinking about a February 7, 2019 posting called, “Our Gratitude Stream”, in which I thanked my mother for her teachings to me.

Enjoy my gratitude for my mother with me today. Thank you

#gratitudelite

A House Inside Of Me, poem by Marian E.Blake

This Doggie Was Knock, Knock, Knocking At Death’s Door Three Times

This video captures the last month of a little Yorkie rescue named Mickey who nearly died, but is alive because of the assistance of several people in his life who cared enough to help him (#YorkieRescueofAmerica). It is the third in a series of postings about Mickey and has prompted further postings about animal rights and pets in the USA.

Links to the earlier postings may be found below, but in brief, the first posting is about an owner’s love for her pet when she becomes very ill. What does one do when faced with life and death yourself?

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How May I Capture “Love” In One Post?

Thirteen year old Mickey is at the center of a grand love story this weekend. His mommy unfortunately has been visited by an aggressive breast cancer once again. Can any of you imagine the trauma of a double mastectomy, the planned potential damage to your heart from radiation and/or chemo, and then (on top of it all) the depth of pain to have to make a decision about the future of your best little doggie friend in the whole world? My friend Sherry is currently in the midst of this wicked storm of life. What would any of you do?

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